Wild Tigers I have known

Logan, soft spoken, lonely and 13 years old, is a boy with a crush.  Unlike his equally lonely friend Joey, who obsesses over the sexual exploits of the slightly older, postpubescent boys, Logan is fixated on the boys themselves, particularly Rodeo Walker.  Rodeo is the only one of the group of cool kids who shows any friendliness toward Logan, meaning he doesn’t go out of his way to make Logan’s life miserable.  As Logan and Rodeo strike up a mismatched friendship, the kind that only works on walks deep into the forest when no one else is around, Logan’s infatuation with Rodeo inspires him to create a new persona named Leah.  Leah and Rodeo grow close through whispered phone calls, and when Leah agrees to meet Rodeo face to face, it is Logan who must finally prove that he can ask for what he so achingly wants.

Painfully surreal and remarkably accurate, Wild Tigers I Have Known has all the makings of a controversial movie that will make some right-wingers down right angry.  Logan, brilliantly played by Malcolm Stumpf, is an effeminate acting boy who masturbates to visions of boys wrestling in singlets, and doesn’t seem to care what the other school kids say about him.  Publicly humiliated and continually called a "Fag" at school, Logan’s only sanctuary from all this ridiculing is his basement and Joey’s bizarre, space-age bedroom. Joey, an equally geeky, but non-gay friend, is a little too dense to see what Logan is all about (even after a penis measuring contest in the closet), but enjoys the sexually-based conversations they usually have about the other boys in the school.  When Logan and Rodeo become closer friends, Joey quickly fades from the scene until one day Logan invites Joey over to "show him something."

The moment at the dawn of adolescence when hormones and daydreams swirl into a heady fog of confusion is poetically evoked in Wild Tigers I Have Known. – Stephen Holden, New York Times

 

Wikipedia | IMDbReview (English) | Review (Deutsch)

  

Tábor Triathlon

Photos by ehm.cz

From the FAQ at the photographers site:

Why are you posting all those pictures and videos free of charge? Isn’t it great feeling to do something for other person expecting nothing in return? There are many great things in the computer world made for everybody for free use. Like Linux for example, great operating system, which can’t be matched by Windows. OpenOffice, equivalent of Microsoft Office can be next example. VirtualDub, a great video processing tool, which I used for creating of my recent videos, is also free. And you know what? These programs are actually better, faster and more reliable than their commercial correspondents. How is that possible? How can be free thing better than that you pay for? Answer is simple: because it is made by people who made them with people in mind, not money. These softwares were and still are being made by hundreds and thousands of people who work hard to help YOU. Do you feel the power of this idea? I do and I want to be part of it. – ehm.cz

Isn’t that nice? ;o)

  

Periodical Political Post *2

  

Felix

UPDATE: The photographer of these photos don’t want his photos to be posted here in an expedient resolution. So I decided to take down all but one. One would imagine a photographer is happy to see one high-res photo to be posted for the free promotion he gets for it but well… it’s his personal right to decide that. Seems like you have to pay him 240 $ if you want to see Felix in high resolution.  At least the parents of his models seem to be very progressive since they have to know that not many people without interest in boys wouldn’t pay that much for a few photos ;) (Comments are closed by the way to prevent further trading of the photos, sorry about that but you know… the legal stuff.)


Found at le blog de Bernard Alapetite

  

Glue

Violent Femmes and wrestling boys. The same boys watching TV, huffing glue, jerking off, playing soccer, dodging water balloons, sharing headphones, and dancing, singing, and drumming at punk rock shows. Listed in this manner, the basic ingredients of Alexis Dos Santos’s Glue don’t sound that different from those of a dozen other teen films. But the way Dos Santos views such material is something else entirely. Glue is that rare kind of filmmaking so attuned to pleasure and spontaneity that it tickles your palate, opening up new possibilities about how to live. The film’s chief subject matter — bisexuality that takes exhilarating form before the constraints of adulthood can arrive — is ideally realized through Dos Santos’s sensual and whim-driven approach.

“If my parents made love before I was conceived, would it be me being born or another boy?” skinny, wild-haired, and sleepy-eyed Lucas (Nahuel Pérez Biscayart) wonders to himself at the beginning of Glue, before his jock friend Nacho (Nahuel Viale) and their mutual crush, the gawky yet beautiful Andrea (Inés Efron), arrive on screen. When Andrea is eventually introduced, it’s via a poolside scene in which polite kisses through a steel fence provide one typically fleet example of Dos Santos’s ability to land on the right use of foreground, background, and happenstance scenic detail to convey a shot or scene’s emotional temperature.

This symbiosis between director and actors — and perhaps even more important, between actors — results in some extraordinary passages. Glue meanders near its end, when, in true teen spirit, it doesn’t want a good time to end. But in its best moments, Dos Santos’s debut feature is an important and exciting addition to Latin American cinema’s evolving views of masculinity. (Sergio de la Mora’s recent book Cinemachismo is an excellent source for historical background on the subject.) Glue’s ménage à trois is more radical than the ones in both Alfonso Cuarón’s Y Tu Mamá También and Fernando Eimbcke’s chaste Duck Season, though one suspects those more commercial movies helped pave the way for the spaces that Dos Santos and his actors discover. Like Julián Hernández’s Broken Sky, in which a trio of young lovers meet and kiss repeatedly in public, Dos Santos’s insular and gutsy film charts territory where people don’t repress their desires.